This is like saying that because of this atrocity, every whi

  28-year-old man should now be on a watch list or face prejudice. It’s a nonsensical, prim

itive argument. Yet one that elites in powerful positions repeat, even though they should know better.

  The trope that all Muslims are somehow predisposed to violence or terrorism is dangerous an

d wrong. Most Muslims — particularly immigrants — keep their heads down, want a quiet, pea

ceful life and want to stay out of trouble. I know this because I am Muslim and know our community. We are not out to c

ause trouble. We don’t come to “invade”; we come to make a better life for ourselves.

  We run your convenience store, drive your cabs, feed you late-night food when you’ve had a drink or look after you when you’r

e ill. We serve our communities. Yet we have become the victims of harassment, hatred and now terrorism.

  Attacks — verbal and physical — on Muslims are par for the course. But society doesn’t seem to care. Our lives and p

ain don’t seem to matter as much because we are seen as second-class citizens or “bad people.”

  I wept Friday on “CNN Talk,” thinking about the sadness of it al

l. It has been a dark day. But if there is any light, it was the outpouring of grief from people of all

backgrounds around the world who sent in messages of solidarity and kindness. If we can take one lesson from the

horror of Christchurch, we have to stop this hate and see Muslims as human beings, just like anyone else.

xxxtz.cn

Ali Shamkhani, secretary of Iran’s Supreme National Security

  Council, was critical of Trump at a rally Saturday.

  ”The US has long been dealt blows by our country and our region and thus regularly bares its warmongering teeth,” Shamkhani said, according to state-run Press TV.

  ”And when a missile is tested thousands of kilometers away, after (issuing empty) threats, all their preside

nt does is put out a tweet,” he said in an apparent reference to North Korea’s missile tests.

  Iran Hostage Crisis Fast Facts

  Shamkhani said the United States is rethinking the election of Trump.

  ”American politicians and people are having second thoughts about their choice of presi

dent and acknowledge that the US has been defeated in materializing its foreign policy,” Shamkhani said.

  Iran’s Supreme Leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, said this week that Iran must resist the United States.

  ”Giving in to the US will make it impudent; the only way is to resist,” Khamenei said.

qhfaaa.com

The UK government, a key US ally on intelligence and security

  is expected to decide this spring which suppliers can provide technology for 5G networks. If it chooses to allow the use of Huawei gear

it could seriously undermine the US campaign against the company and influence other governments that are weighing how to handle the issue.

  The UK Department of Culture, Media and Sport said in a statement earlier this w

eek that it was “looking at a range of options” and that “no decisions have been taken.”

  ’A rigorous, ruthless advancement of China’s interests’

  The RUSI report — written by former diplomat Charles Parton, who spent 22 years working in mai

nland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan — warned that the UK government needed to stay alert for int

erference from the Chinese government across a range of fronts, including politics and research.

  Britain is a particularly appealing target for interference as a close

US ally with a large Chinese ethnic community and an open, advanced economy, Parton said.

  Huawei founder Ren Zhengfei: The US ‘cannot crush us’

  ”Beijing’s interference is not aimed at subverting the West, but represents a rigorous, ruthl

ess advancement of China’s interests and values at the expense of those of the West,” he wrote.

aishedesat.com

Qomolangma reserve bans ordinary tourists in core zone

Mount Qomolangma National Nature Reserve in China’s Tibet Autonomous Region has ban

ned ordinary tourists from entering its core zone to better conserve the environment of the world’s highest mountain.

But for travelers who have a climbing permit, the mountai

neering activities will not be affected, according to the reserve which was set up in 1988.

Covering an area of around 33,800 square km including a 10,312-square km co

re zone, the reserve is home to one of the world’s most vulnerable ecosystems.

Recently, a report went viral online claiming the Qo

molangma base camp was “permanently closed due to heavy pollution.” But local authorities denied the claim.

Kelsang, deputy director with the reserve’s admin

istration, said ordinary tourists are banned from areas above Rongpo Mo

nastery, around 5,000 meters above sea level. A new tent camp will be set up nearly two km away from the original one.

ex187.cn

“As you command, Sire.” Maege Mormont had ridden south

“As you command, Sire.” Maege Mormont had ridden south with Robb, Jon knew. Her eldest daughter had joined the Young Wolf’s host as well. Even if both of them

had died, however, Lady Maege had other daughters, some with children of their own. Had they gone with Robb as well? Surely Lady Maege would have left at

least one of the older girls behind as castellan. He did not understand why Lyanna should be writing Stannis, and

could not help but wonder if the girl’s answer might have been different if the letter had been sealed with a direwolf

instead of a crowned stag, and signed by Jon Stark, Lord of Winterfell. It is too late for such misgivings. You made your choice.

“Two score ravens were sent out,” the king complained, “yet we get no response but silence and defiance. Homage is the duty every leal subject owes his king. Yet

your father’s bannermen all turn their back on me, save the Karstarks. Is Arnolf Karstark the only man of honor in the north?”

Arnolf Karstark was the late Lord Rickard’s uncle. He had been made the castellan of Karhold when his nephew

and his sons went south with Robb, and he had been the first to respond to King Stannis’s call for homage, with a raven

declaring his allegiance. The Karstarks have no other choice, Jon might have said. Rickard Karstark had betrayed the direwolf and spilled the blood of lions.

The stag was Karhold’s only hope. “In times as confused as these, even men of

honor must wonder where their duty lies. Your Grace is not the only king in the realm demanding homage.”

Babu exited the cage in the same careful way he had enteredit. The cage had two floors, one level with us, the other at

theback, higher by about three feet, that led outside to the island.

The goat scrambled to this second level. Mahisha, nowunconcerned with Babu,

paralleled the move in his cage in afluid, effortless motion. He crouched and lay

still, his slowlymoving tail the only sign of tension.
Babu stepped up to the trapdoor

between the cages andstarted pulling it open. In anticipation of satisfaction, Mahishafell silent. I heard two things at that moment: Father saying”Never forget

this lesson” as he looked on grimly, and thebleating of the goat. It must

 

have been

bleating all along,

onlywe couldn’t

hear it before.

shlf18.com

They had free folk drifting in most every night,

They had free folk drifting in most every night, starved half-frozen creatures who had run from the battle beneath the Wall only to crawl back when they realized there was no safe place to run to. “Was the mother questioned?” Jon

asked. Stannis Baratheon had smashed Mance Rayder’s host and made the King-Beyond-the-Wall his captive … but the wildlings were still out there, the Weeper and Tormund Giantsbane and thousands more.

“Aye, m’lord,” said Edd, “but all she knows is that she ran off during the battle and hid in the woods after. We filled her full of porridge, sent her to the pens, and burned the babe.”

Burning dead children had ceased to trouble Jon Snow; live ones were another matter. Two kings to wake the dragon. The father first and then the

son, so both die kings. The words had been murmured by one of the queen’s men as Maester Aemon had cleaned his wounds. Jon had tried to dismiss

them as his fever talking. Aemon had demurred. “There is power in a king’s blood,” the old maester had warned, “and better men than Stannis have done

worse things than this.” The king can be harsh and unforgiving, aye, but a babe still on the breast? Only a monster would give a living child to the flames.

He spoke again. “Some people say God died during thePartition in 1947. He may have died in 1971 during the war.

Or he may have died yesterday here in Pondicherry in anorphanage. That’s what some people say, Pi. When I was yourage, I lived in bed, racked with

polio. I asked myself every day,‘Where is God? Where is God? Where is God?’ God nevercame. It wasn’t God who saved me – it was medicine. Reasonis my

prophet and it tells me that as a watch stops, so wedie. It’s the end. If the watch doesn’t work properly, it must befixed here and now by us. One day we will take hold of themeans of production and there will be justice on

earth.”This was all a bit much for me. The tone was right – lovingand brave – but the details seemed bleak.

 

I said nothing.

Itwasn’t for

fear of angering

Mr. Kumar.

qianpadac.com

Jobs was somewhat amused by Ellison’s self-appointed role.

Jobs was somewhat amused by Ellison’s self-appointed role. “Larry brings this up now and then,” he told a reporter. “I try to explain my role at Apple is

 

what is going on,” he told Amelio. “I think all this is crazy.” Then he added a reassurance that was not at all genuine: “You and I have a good relationship.”

Jobs could have ended the speculation by releasing a statement rejecting Ellison’s idea, but much to Amelio’s annoyance, he didn’t. He remained aloof, which served both his interests and his nature.

By then the press had turned against Amelio. Business Week ran a cover asking “Is Apple Mincemeat?”; Red Herring ran an editorial headlined “Gil

Amelio, Please Resign”; and Wired ran a cover that showed the Apple logo crucified as a sacred heart with a crown of thorns and the headline “Pray.” Mike Barnicle of the Boston Globe, railing against years of Apple

mismanagement, wrote, “How can these nitwits still draw a paycheck when they took the only computer that didn’t frighten people and turned it into the technological equivalent of the 1997 Red Sox bullpen?”

When Jobs and Amelio had signed the contract in February, Jobs began hopping around exuberantly and declared, “You and I need to go out and have a great bottle of wine to celebrate!” Amelio offered to bring wine from

his cellar and suggested that they invite their wives. It took until June before they settled on a date, and despite the rising tensions they were able to have a good time. The food and wine were as mismatched as the diners; Amelio

brought a bottle of 1964 Cheval Blanc and a Montrachet that each cost about $300; Jobs chose a vegetarian restaurant in Redwood City where the food bill totaled $72. Amelio’s wife remarked

afterward,

“He’s such

a charmer,

and his wife is too.”

www.neuventure.cn

That spring Larry Ellison saw Amelio at a party and introduced

That spring Larry Ellison saw Amelio at a party and introduced him to the technology journalist Gina Smith, who asked how Apple was doing. “You know, Gina, Apple is like a ship,” Amelio answered. “That ship is loaded with

treasure, but there’s a hole in the ship. And my job is to get everyone to row in the same direction.” Smith looked perplexed and asked, “Yeah, but what about the hole?” From then on, Ellison and Jobs joked about the parable of

the ship. “When Larry relayed this story to me, we were in this sushi place, and I literally fell off my chair laughing,” Jobs recalled. “He was just such a

buffoon, and he took himself so seriously. He insisted that everyone call him Dr. Amelio. That’s always a warning sign.”

Brent Schlender, Fortune’s well-sourced technology reporter, knew Jobs and was familiar with his thinking, and in March he came out with a story detailing the mess. “Apple Computer, Silicon Valley’s paragon of dysfunctional

management and fumbled techno-dreams, is back in crisis mode, scrambling lugubriously in slow motion to deal with imploding sales, a floundering

technology strategy, and a hemorrhaging brand name,” he wrote. “To the Machiavellian eye, it looks as if Jobs, despite the lure of Hollywood—lately he

has been overseeing Pixar, maker of Toy Story and other computer-animated films—might be scheming to take over Apple.”

Once again Ellison publicly floated the idea of doing a hostile takeover and installing his “best friend” Jobs as CEO. “Steve’s the only one who can save Apple,” he told reporters. “I’m ready to help him the minute he says the

word.” Like the third time the boy cried wolf, Ellison’s latest takeover musings didn’t get much notice, so later in the month he told Dan Gillmore of the San Jose Mercury News that he was forming an investor group to raise $1 billion

to buy a majority stake in Apple. (The company’s market value was about $2.3 billion.) The day the story came out, Apple stock shot up 11% in heavy

trading. To add to the frivolity, Ellison set up an email address, [email protected], asking the

general public to

vote on whether

he should go

ahead with it.

neuventure.cn

Jobs’s pep talk could have been a redeeming finale to

Jobs’s pep talk could have been a redeeming finale to Amelio’s frightening performance. Unfortunately Amelio came back onstage and resumed his ramblings for another hour. Finally, more than three hours after the show

began, Amelio brought it to a close by calling Jobs back onstage and then, in a surprise, bringing up Steve Wozniak as well. Again there was pandemonium. But Jobs was clearly annoyed. He avoided engaging in a triumphant trio

scene, arms in the air. Instead he slowly edged offstage. “He ruthlessly ruined the closing moment I had planned,” Amelio later complained. “His own

feelings were more important than good press for Apple.” It was only seven days into the new year for Apple, and already it was clear that the center would not hold.

Jobs immediately put people he trusted into the top ranks at Apple. “I wanted to make sure the really good people who came in from NeXT didn’t get knifed

in the back by the less competent people who were then in senior jobs at Apple,” he recalled. Ellen Hancock, who had favored choosing Sun’s Solaris

over NeXT, was on the top of his bozo list, especially when she continued to want to use the kernel of Solaris in the new Apple operating system. In

response to a reporter’s question about the role Jobs would play in making that decision, she answered curtly, “None.” She was wrong. Jobs’s first move was to make sure that two of his friends from NeXT took over her duties.

To head software engineering, he tapped his buddy Avie Tevanian. To run the hardware side, he called on Jon Rubinstein, who had done the same at NeXT

back when it had a hardware division. Rubinstein was vacationing on the Isle of Skye when Jobs called him. “Apple needs some help,” he said. “Do you want

to come aboard?” Rubinstein did. He got back in time to attend Macworld and see Amelio bomb onstage. Things were worse than he expected. He and

Tevanian would exchange glances at meetings as if they had stumbled into an insane asylum, with people making deluded assertions

while Amelio

sat at the end

of the table in a

seeming stupor.

www.pakco.cn

Jobs had the audience cheering from his opening line

Jobs had the audience cheering from his opening line: “It’s great to be back.” He

began by recounting the history of personal computer architecture, and

he promised that they would now witness an event “that occurs only once or twice in a decade—a time when a new architecture is rolled out that is going to

change the face of computing.” The NeXT software and hardware were designed, he said, after three years of consulting with

universities across the country. “What we realized was that higher ed wants a personal mainframe.”

As usual there were superlatives. The product was “incredible,” he said, “the best thing we could have imagined.” He praised the beauty of even the parts

unseen. Balancing on his fingertips the foot-square circuit board that would be nestled in the foot-cube box, he enthused, “I hope you get a chance to look

at this a little later. It’s the most beautiful printed circuit board I’ve ever seen in my life.” He then showed how the computer could play speeches—he

featured King’s “I Have a Dream” and Kennedy’s “Ask Not”—and send email with audio attachments. He leaned into the microphone on the computer to

record one of his own. “Hi, this is Steve, sending a message on a pretty historic day.” Then he asked those in the audience to add “a round of applause” to the message, and they did.

One of Jobs’s management philosophies was that it is crucial, every now and then, to roll the dice and “bet the company” on some new idea or technology.

At the NeXT launch, he boasted of an example that, as it turned out, would not be a wise gamble: having a high-capacity (but slow) optical read/write

disk and no floppy disk as a backup. “Two years ago we made a decision,” he said. “We saw some new technology and we made a decision to risk our company.”

Then he turned to a feature that would prove more prescient. “What we’ve done is made the first real digital books,” he said, noting the inclusion of the

Oxford edition of Shakespeare and other tomes. “There has not been an advancement in

the state of the

art of printed

book technology

since Gutenberg.”

www.ezon.bj.cn